Texting and Driving “Drivers Mode” | SC Personal Injury Attorneys

Texting and Driving “Drivers Mode” | SC Personal Injury Attorneys

While everyone knows about texting and driving, here’s something the phone makers could do.

Texting While Driving Dangers

Because we already know the dangers, this blog won’t remind you of the obvious. And it appears older adults are actually worse than teenagers this time. However, despite new laws and harsher penalties, people still keep texting and driving. Rather, no matter what, we just can’t seem to stop ourselves. So what else is there to do? While there are many ideas out there, here is one that actually would seem to work.

Technology Solutions and “Drivers Mode”

Currently, I own two vehicles. While I still love my 12 year old Lexus, it still has a cassette player. Certainly, it is “old school” but still rides like a dream. And if I have my key on me, it unlocks the doors as I approach. For years, I thought this was pretty fancy stuff. However, I recently bought a new Chevy truck which is pretty amazing. Now, once I plug in my phone, most things are by voice command. Furthermore, the truck resets most functions including BlueTooth and streaming music. So why not set my phone to “drivers mode” that would stop any texting while in motion? After all, technology already prevents other activities in the car. Finally, we may have a solution to stop ourselves.

In addition to serious personal injury claims, our firm also defends DUI charges. As part of that practice, we have learned the many physical and mental divided tasks needed to drive. Consequently, there are studies that show texting is actually more dangerous than driving impaired. While I initially questioned those findings, I now agree. Why? Because someone knows they are not safe, they at least try to focus on driving. However, people texting think they are fine and look away for “just a few seconds.” However, at highway speeds, they can go several hundred yards down the road without looking. And that’s when very bad things can happen. Consequently, lives are changed forever in an instant. Sadly, it’s too late then.

SC Motorcycle and Car Collide, Resulting in a Fatality and DUI Charges

A motorcyclist and car collided Saturday night in Columbia, killing the motorcyclist upon impact.Personal Injury Attorney

According to the police reports, the defendant was attempting to make a left hand turn onto Burdell Drive, when he intoxicatingly failed to yield to the oncoming motorcycle, and the motorcycle hit the right front passenger door of the defendant’s car.

The 26-year-old driver of the vehicle that hit the biker is now facing a slew of charges, including a “hit-and-run charge, driving under suspicion of a second offense, open container chargers, drug and possible distribution charges, failure to render aid and lastly, a Felony DUI.”

When a person causes serious injury or sadly death by vehicle in SC while driving under the influence, their charge is automatically elevated to a felony, as opposed to just a DUI. Moreover, when a person causes peril for another, and then fails to render aid or assistance to them, they can also be charged. This is the epitome of a hit-and-run, and another mechanism for punishing those who do so.

The Richland County EMT rushed the young man to Palmetto Health, where he was pronounced dead shortly after arrival due to the injuries suffered. The young victim’s parent were not aware of the accident until the body was discovered Sunday morning.

The defendant left the scene of the crime immediately after fatally wounded the victim; yet returned to the scene later, where an eye witness’s description allowed the police to identify and apprehend the defendant.

If you have been seriously injured by a drunk driver on your motorcycle or in your vehicle, contact the law offices of Reeves, Aiken, and Hightower, LLP toll-free at 877-374-5999 for information on your options.

Lancaster County South Carolina Motorcycle Accident Results in One Death

A man from Indian Land has been pronounced dead after a terrifying motorcycle accident in Lancaster County.  According to the police Rock Hill Motorcycle Injuryreports, the 68-year-old was riding a 2007 Harley Davidson westbound on South Carolina’s Highway 903 after 12:45 p.m.

He was traveling at the posted speed limit when all of the sudden he tipped over or “spilled” from the motorcycle. No sources have been able to state yet why the man was unable to stabilize himself throughout his route.

What witnesses have stated, however, is that the man had been riding motorcycles for almost 50 years and was considered one of the most experienced riders in his community.

The resident retired at Sun City Lakes adult retirement community, where he had a reputation for riding. He was active in activities both in and outside of the retirement facility.

People who knew him spoke well of him, but always made mention of his love for riding motorcycles, and how safe and careful he always was when traveling on his bike.  Further, at the time of the accident, the man was wearing his helmet.

The actual cause of death is still yet to be determined; however the man was pronounced dead on scene, so he most likely suffered very little. Officials are working diligently to determine the exact cause of death.

What is important to note about this particular story is that even the most experienced riders can have fatal accidents while driving their motorcycle. Thus, extra safety precautions are always a must, as they may reduce the likelihood of serious injury or even worse, death.  If it is determined that someone else was at fault, the family of the rider may have a wrongful death claim for the other driver’s negligence.

Sometimes, no matter how many safety precautions you have taken, accidents are unpredictable and sometimes, unavoidable. If you, or someone you know has been involved in any sort of serious motorcycle accident, contact the attorneys at Reeves, Aiken, and Hightower, LLP to discuss your case at 877-374-5999. The initial consultation is free, and our experienced motorcycle accident attorneys are personally available to help fight for the compensation you deserve.

Intersections Present Gravest Danger for Motorcyclists

The intersection is the most dangerous place for those riding motorcycles.  An intersection may be in the center of an urban area or at the driveway in a residential street; basically anywhere that traffic Motorcycle DWI Attorneycrosses the rider’s path.  The most often encountered dangers include cars turning in front of the rider, including such occurrences as cars turning left from the lane to your right and cars that pull into the rider’s lane on side streets.

Problem: One major problem is that motorcyclists are not as visible to drivers, so there is no guarantee that others see you when you are riding.  The fact that a driver has engaged in eye contact with a rider does not guarantee the driver will yield.  It is too often that a driver looks directly at a motorcyclist and still fails to actually “see” the rider.  Therefore, the only person on the road the rider can count on is himself or herself.  The safe bet is when a car can enter your path, assume that it will.

Safety Tips: So, the idea behind this article is for a rider to increase his or her chances of being seen at an intersection.  We recommend that riders increase chances of being seen at intersections by riding with headlights on at all times, ride in the lane that provides the best view, and provide a space cushion around the motorcycle that permits the rider to take elusive action.

At Reeves, Aiken & Hightower, LLP, we have riders in our office, and want to ensure that they are as safe as possible while traveling the North and South Carolina roads.  Please listen to our pointers and be as safe as possible out there.  However, we are here to help if you or another close friend, who rides, is injured in an accident.  Too often we see automobiles involved in accidents with motorcycles simply because they were not paying attention and did not see the rider.

Therefore, if you or a loved one has been injured in a motorcycle accident, do not hesitate to call the law offices of Reeves, Aiken & Hightower, LLP at our Baxter Village office in Fort Mill, South Carolina at 803-548-4444, or toll-free at 877-374-5999, and we will be happy to assist you.

Motorcycle Accident Requires Amputation

A motorist in South Carolina has been charged after allegedly fleeing the scene of a motorcycle accident.Motorcycle Accident Attorney  Witnesses report that the man crashed his vehicle into two motorcyclists, injuring one of them to such an extent that his leg had to be amputated.  The man was initially charged with DUI charges; however, these have been dismissed.

The DUI charge was dismissed after a magistrate judge found that they were not supported by probable cause.  However, hit-and-run charges remain, and this will be further examined by a grand jury.  The man was arrested outside of a bar on the night of the accident, when he told patrons of his involvement in the accident, and that he had been drinking subsequently.  The patrons, however, could not say how much the man had consumed.

A blood sample was taken from the driver, but these results have not been made available at this point.  Two motorcyclists were hit by the car, and they were both seriously injured. One rider, as stated previously, had a leg amputated, and the other suffered multiple broken bones.

When you are a motorcyclist, it is important to understand that you may be exposed to more inherent dangers on the road.

The major issue is that a motorcyclist is more exposed to dangers than vehicles because they do not have a protective structure around them.  Further, it is more difficult to see riders.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a motorcycle accident, call 877-374-5999.

Motorcycle Safety Tips from the Personal Injury Firm that Cares

Operating a motorcycle on the roads, and especially the highways these days, is inherently dangerous.  It is becoming more and more important to abide by certain safety precautions when operating any joe-motorcycle and car accidentvehicle, but especially motorcycles due to the fact that your entire body is basically exposed.

First and foremost, the rider MUST wear a helmet.  A crash is likely to occur, especially if you are a rider who navigates busy roads and intersections, and one out of every five motorcycle crashes result in a head or neck injury.  And, this is more likely to occur when the rider is inexperienced, beginning, or untrained.  Some riders don’t wear helmets because they think helmets will limit their view to the sides.  While others only wear helmets on long trips, with the mindset that they are not riding at a high-speed and therefore are not in as much danger.  North Carolina law requires that you wear a helmet at all times; so, wear a helmet!

Next, the right clothing is also imperative for motorcycle riders to wear for protection.  This can protect your skin, and even help to prevent broken bones in an accident.  It also provides comfort, as well as protection from heat, cold, debris and hot moving parts on the motorcycle.  Protective clothing should cover arms and legs completely, and fit snug enough to keep from flapping in the wind.  Sturdy synthetic material provides a lot of protection as well.  Finally, wear gloves to allow a better grip on the handlebars, and protect your hands in a crash.

Third, make sure you have the right motorcycle for you, meaning your feet should reach the ground while you are seated on the motorcycle, and controls should be easy to operate; meaning you should not have to stretch to reach things and the motorcycle should “fit” you.   A tip for beginners is that smaller motorcycles are typically easy to operate.  In other words, do not attempt to ride a customized chopper as your first motorcycle.

Finally, make sure you are completely familiar with the motorcycle controls before you take it out on the street.  If you are riding a borrowed motorcycle, make sure that you:

  1. Make all the checks you would on your own;
  2. Find out where everything is, such as turn signals, horn, and headlights;
  3. Know how to work the throttle, clutch, and brakes; and finally
  4. Ride very cautiously, and always be aware of your surroundings.

These are just a few of the hundreds of safety tips required when one is operating a motorcycle.  While abiding by these basic procedures, new users are recommended to take a safety course as well as read the motorcycle owners manual to ensure you are knowledgeable on all of the devices on the bike.  A large amount of accidents take place each year, when riders are involved in accidents, and due to the fact that they are open while riding, motorcyclists generally feel the brunt of the impact.

If you or a loved one has been involved in a motorcycle accident, and have been injured, call us.  We have years of experience in dealing with personal injury cases, and love to help our fellow riders.  For a consultation, give us a call at our Fort Mill, South Carolina office at 803-548-4444, or toll-free at 877-374-5999, and we will be happy to assist you.