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Spring Maintenance: Routine Bike Checks

With Spring right around the corner, bikes which have been put away for the Winter can finally have their chance to shine again. However, before getting back out on the road, it’s important to perform some quick Spring maintenance. That way, you avoid running into issues when you’re out on that first joy ride of the season…

Spring Maintenance: What to Double-Check

Oil and filters

Proper Spring maintenance includes checking and replacing your fuel and oil supplies. Make sure that your oil still looks good, and add more or replace it if the levels or quality are not up to par. The same goes for your gas tank. If you have any leftover fuel from the Winter, it’s a good idea to drain it and run some fresh fuel through the lines.

Furthermore, your bike filters need a check too. When checking your oil and gas, check the filters as well. Your oil, fuel, and air filters are all important and work together to provide you with the best ride possible. 

Battery and plugs

Battery and spark plug checks are sometimes overlooked during Spring maintenance. Also, check your battery for residue buildup and if it has any charge. If your charge appears to be on the weaker side, try to give it a quick charge and work on getting a new one soon.

Spark plugs can be easy to check, but sometimes riders overthink them during their Spring maintenance. First, just pull out the plugs and check their condition. If they need replacement, just go for a plug that had a good reputation and fits your bike.

Chain, breaks and tires

Your chain, breaks, and tires all work together, so if one is in bad shape, they all can be impacted. For your chain, check for rust or breaks first. If it all looks good, give it a quick clean and apply some new lubricant. Then, most of your Spring maintenance is done.

Your last stop on Spring maintenance, is checking the breaks. As we all know, brake function is key to safety for any rider or driver. Check the break pads for wear, and replace the brake fluid with a new batch. For the tires, make sure they have the right amount of air in them. Give them a change as well if they’re a bit too worn out.

Spring is a great time to start riding again. Of course, you want to make sure your bike is still in working order after a Winter tucked away. Doing this Spring maintenance can help make sure your bike is ready for the many, many rides ahead.

Anti-Lock Braking System Pro’s

Braking with a motorcycle can be a difficult thing to do. The process is much different than braking in a car. In a car all we have to do is press the brake, and all four tires respond in harmony with one another. But on most motorcycles, the front and rear brake use separate controls. Each control operates a wheel. And a wheel can easily lock up during a hard brake. Being that a motorcyclist never knows when they will have to use the brakes abruptly, this can be a safety problem. A wheel that locks up instead of braking can cause a serious accident. In some cases the impact of a locked wheel will throw the rider from the bike. Therefore, an anti-lock braking system for your motorcycle is a good safety option.

Anti-Lock Braking System Pro’s

1.  How They Work 

In short, an anti-lock braking system works by measuring wheel speed. Typically, a wheel speed sensor send signals to the anti-lock system. From those signals, the system can judge whether the wheel is about to stop.

In that case, the system uses that information to rapidly adjust the pressure from the brake cylinder on the brake caliper. This reduces pressure if a lock up is about to happen, and increases the pressure again once the bike has gained traction once again.

2.  Benefits of Anti-lock Braking 

There are many safety benefits to having an anti-lock braking system on a motorcycle. Studies show that the rate of deadly crashes is thirty-one percent lower on a bikewith an anti-lock system. When tested on a track, riders stopped quicker with the anti-lock system. In addition, the required braking distance also improved to a shorter distance.

As far as feeling the brake system goes, the anti-lock braking system does not affect normal braking. It is only issued in a time of emergency. Furthermore, the system comes as light as one and a half pounds. So, as you can see, an anti-lock braking system can go a long way in giving you added protection behind the wheel of a motorcycle. We encourage you to explore your options, and ride safely. 

Inexperienced Drivers: Motorcyclist Dangers 

Young drivers, or inexperienced drivers, can be quite a liability to the roadway. This isn’t their fault. After all, we all have to start somewhere when it comes to managing highways, fast lanes, and bustling streets. However, when you’re a motorcyclist— inexperienced drivers present an added hazard to the roadway. Maybe it’s a student driver, new driver, or someone from outside of the area. No matter the reason, riders might find themselves surrounded by drivers who aren’t aware of bikers, and the etiquette you should use around them.

Inexperienced Drivers: Motorcyclist Dangers

If you are new to the roadway, you might not be used to driving around alternative vehicles, such as tractor trailers and motorcycles. Seasoned drivers tend to be more comfortable, and therefore respond in the proper manner when it comes to different vehicles. They might better understand how to share the roadway. A proper following distance makes all the difference in terms of biker safety, especially when an unexpected stop comes along. Moments such as this, is where proper training comes in…

Driver education

Maybe you grew up in a low-traffic, rural area. But now, you’re moving to the city and the traffic is quite jarring. Every single one of us sat in a Driver’s Ed class. But, for many of us, that was quite a long time ago. Therefore, it’s important that we educate ourselves. If something in particular is difficult for you to understand— research it. We, even as adults, never stop learning. Look up proper etiquette for driving near a motorcycle, tractor trailer, or a vehicle that you’re unfamiliar with, such as a bicycle.

Ultimately, we are responsible for our own safety. But, staying safe yourself often means helping others to stay safe on the roadway. Increase your following distance, watch for coming obstructions, merging cars, and the like. The road is changing every day, and no two commutes will ever be the same. But, as drivers of all experience levels, we want to avoid accident, keep ourselves safe, and prevent issues from occurring. We encourage you to keep learning, take the long route if it makes you more comfortable, and do your part in keeping the roadway safe.

Rear-Ending Motorcycles: A Dangerous Incident

A small fender bender typically doesn’t do massive amounts of damage to the drivers involved. Typically, at worst, they’ll face a bit of whiplash and residual headaches. However, when it comes to rear-ending motorcycles, the damage can be quite serious. Think about it: when you rear-end a car, it typically lurches a bit and stops. Then, you’ll have a cracked bumper, but typically, everyone— and even the vehicles, will be able to drive away. However, on a motorcycle? That hit can result in the rider ejecting from the bike and into your windshield, or even the roadway. These accidents are serious and, when they occur, they can cause quite a bit of damage.

Rear-Ending Motorcycles: A Dangerous Incident

There’s no denying that either party can be at-fault in this scenario. Bikers, just like drivers, must take responsibility for their own safety. However, bikers are already at a disadvantage when it comes to safety. One additional fact to consider, is that they don’t quite have as much ability to keep a strong following distance as passenger vehicles do. When driving in traffic, we can do a lot with out vehicles to keep our own space. From increasing your own following distance, to giving that quick ‘brake check’ to the driver who can’t seem to grasp the idea that you don’t control the pace of traffic. Motorcyclists can increase their own following distance, but if someone is riding them closely— they don’t have that same luxury of giving a warning tap to the brakes.

This can be quite dangerous for motorcyclists, as I’m sure you already guessed. There are plenty of ways in which this can result in an accident. For instance, they hit the brakes and the car driver does not slow down. Instead, the rear-end the motorcyclist. When you’re in a passenger vehicle, and you perform a brake check, you typically accept that the other driver might hit you. It’s part of that little game we play. An accident isn’t the ideal end result, but we are trying to prove a point… right? But when it comes to brake checking that leads to rear-ending motorcycles? The biker isn’t quite in the driver’s seat— no pun intended…

There is a quite a bit of bias that comes up towards motorcyclists

Being a motorcyclist comes with a few distinct challenges. Many of them are on the roadway, but another serious challenge— typically arises when they least expect it. Biker bias is very much an issue within the justice system, and amongst jurors. The problem with this, is not that bikers dislike the image others have of them. Rather, the problem is that that image leads to jury bias when they need it the very least.

In the unfortunate instance where a motorcyclist, or their family, ends up in court to reach a settlement for injuries or death— jury bias can be particularly harmful. Let’s face it: most people on that jury likely drove a passenger vehicle to get there. Therefore, they likely have a certain image in their mind when they think of bikers and the way in which they drive. These biases do not typically apply to the average biker. However, they can be harmful to them when they are in the court room.

If you, or someone you know, has been injured in a motorcycle accident— you deserve proper representation when going before an unintentionally stacked jury. So, do your research, find the right fit for you, and get the compensation you deserve. You should not have to pay for the damages caused by another driver. Especially at the hands of a misunderstanding jury. We wish you luck in handling your case, and offer our services if you might need them.

Rear-view Cameras and Motorcycles: Putting Bikers at Risk

Rear-view cameras are a staple in newer vehicles, and they come in handy most of the time. However, this technology, just like all other technology, has it’s failings. One failing in particular, is the blind trust that many drivers have in it. Many rear-view cameras will beep if there is an obstruction in your path for backing up, so many people don’t think to actually look behind them. Therefore, when that object doesn’t register for your back-up camera, you are at risk of hitting someone or something. One object at particular risk, is a motorcycle.

Motorcycles and Rear-View Cameras: Putting Bikers at Risk

Bikers are already more difficult to spot

Therefore, we must take added precaution when backing up. A back-up camera serves the purpose of aiding your backing up, not dictating it completely. So, it’s important that while your rear-view cameras play their role, you also take some responsibility in it. Keep in mind that disclaimer that pops up on the screen when you use the camera; something to the effect of ‘not liable for damages or injury’. Therefore, if you cause injury, your car company is not taking responsibility.

One other issue to take into account is the accuracy of those safety features on your vehicle. They beep, or alert you in some way of obstructions. But how do they measure them? What will alert you and what will not? Motorcycles are particularly small, and therefore they may not register as quickly, or even at all.

Take for example, a driver, who is in a rush, driving a sedan with a rear-view camera. The driver of the sedan may exclusively depend on the camera to back up. Because the camera only displays the area behind the driver, the driver must look left and right. If the driver fails to look both ways, the potential for an accident is at large. If a driver relies solely on this camera; other drivers, pedestrians, or riders may be at risk.

Bikers are also already at higher risk of injury

Aside from the heightened risk of being hit, they’re also at an increased risk of injury. So, while hitting anyone can be problematic, a biker will likely incur more injuries than the average driver. So, settlements will be higher, injury will be greater, and you will have more to deal with in fixing this issue. All in all, you should take from this that a back-up camera should be an accessory to help rather than carry all the weight. Still look to your sides, and behind you. You never know what might be hiding outside of the cameras line of sight.

Common Complaints Bikers Have For Passenger Car Drivers

When it comes to motorcycles, passenger car drivers have plenty of complaints. From the sound, how they share the road, and the stigma of how they drive. There’s no doubt about it, your everyday driver likely has a little bit of an aversion to motorcyclists. But, there a few common complaints bikers have for you too…

Common Complaints Bikers Have for Passenger Vehicle Drivers

Driver’s Who Don’t Use Their Turn Signals

One of the most common biker complaints is when driver’s don’t use their turn signals. By using your signals, you give a rider behind your or turning in front of you a heads up. Without it, they must gauge whether you are slowing down or not. Or the only warning they get, is when your brake lights come on right before you stop. This is especially dangerous for bikers because stopping on a dime can be quite difficult— much more difficult than for a passenger vehicle.

Poor Road Conditions 

Another cause for biker complaints comes from poor road conditions. As you know when driving in your car, hitting a huge pothole is not fun. For larger vehicles, they can cause some alignment issues and may just be uncomfortable. Now, imagine hitting one on a motorcycle. First, they can be even more uncomfortable and can cause cosmetic and actual damage to your bike. But much more, they are dangerous for bikers. Any type of holes and debris can do a number on motorcycles. Therefore, poor road conditions can pose a huge threat to bikers.

Wiper Fluid Hits Them In the Face 

Have you ever been traveling down the road and you have a huge bug hits your windshield. Rather than riding down the road with his guts in plain view, you spray your windshield and have the wipers take care of it. But as you get your window clean, a biker receives a nice wash down from all the fluid that you just washed off. As you can imagine, having a mysterious fluid whip you in the face randomly, is not a fun feeling. Likewise, a leftover cigarette butt that’s flies from the driver’s window and into your face isn’t fun either. These can act as distractions, and make it difficult for the biker to focus in on the road.

Squeezing Them Out 

Finally, possibly the most important of common complaints bikers have is that drivers squeeze them out. For the most part, bikers should be making calculated moves when driving through traffic. If they weave through traffic or a stopped intersection, it’s normally for a safer purpose. So when you see them making these moves, and you move over to block them out, it’s frustrating. Yes, bikes are smaller. Yes, they can fit in spaces your vehicle will not be able to fit in. So allow them to do so, and avoid blocking them out. You never know what they’re seeing that you’re not.

These complaints may not mean a lot to car drivers, but bikers are drivers too; they are members of the road as well. So, cooperate. No driver is perfect, and they will make mistakes. But, part of being a good driver means making adjustments and being observant of other members of the roadway. So, drive safe, drive smart, and watch out for motorcyclists.