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Job Interview Post-Divorce: How To Prepare

Getting back to work after your divorce can be tricky, especially if you haven’t worked in a while. However, once you do land a job interview post-divorce, you may worry about how you can best prepare. There are a few things you’ll want to do in particular that’ll help you get ready…

Job Interview Post-Divorce: Tools For Success

Do your research

One of the best things to do for a job interview post-divorce is some research. Now, you probably already did some when you were applying. Still, you’ll want to go deeper than just what the job description says. This is a good opportunity for you to show that you’re really interested in the position.

 Take this time to really get a good understanding of what the company does, their history, and how they present themselves. You should also look up anything in the job description that you’re unaware of. If you know who’s interviewing you, find out some more about them as well. Every little thing will help!

Practice as much as you can

Odds are you’ve got a lot on your mind coming out of your divorce. However, for a job interview post-divorce, you’ll really want to focus and practice. Trying to remember everything on the spot will make it more likely for you to freeze up and make a bad impression.

Instead, spend as much time practicing beforehand as you can. You don’t want to sound robotic, but you’ll want to have a general answer in mind for their questions. Some common ones include going over your experience, why you want to work with them, your work style, and future goals. Once you know these questions are coming, it’ll be a lot easier to plan your answers.

Be ready to prove yourself

It’s very rare for someone to be perfectly suited for a job. Rather, most people have one or two areas they’re somewhat underqualified in. Companies know this and use the interviewing process as a way to see if you have any familiarity with these areas and if you’re willing to quickly learn them.

 Therefore, as part of your job interview post-divorce, make sure you explain how you can use your past experience to help you at work. The last thing you want to say is that you simply have no experience whatsoever. Rather, they’ll be much more willing to hire you if you can show them how you have some of the necessary skills already.

How-to Juggle Co-parenting and Back-to-School Stress

Preparing for the new school year can be a busy and stressful time. There are so many things to get taken care of before the school year starts. This can be even more complicated if you are having to juggle co-parenting and back-to-school as well. There are some steps that can make this transition smoother.

How-to Juggle Co-parenting and Back-to-School: Smooth Transitions

Shopping

The start of a school year can bring a lot of extra expenses for families. For example, kids will need new clothes, supplies for school, and electronic devices. Neither parent should have to pay for all of the items on their own. This should one of the things you discuss when working through co-parenting and back-to-school things.

Be sure to coordinate who will purchase what, so that it will eliminate unnecessary duplicates. Also, this will help to ensure that your child has everything they need. Be prepared for disagreements about brands, price points, and values. Try to find a common ground wherever possible.

Build a Schedule

During the school year, children need a schedule and consistency. Make sure your children know where they are staying each night. Also, make sure that your children know who will be dropping them off or picking them up. Try to keep this schedule consistent so that your children have structure.

A great tip is to create a digital calendar to share with your ex. This will back co-parenting and back-to-school preparations much smoother. For example, you can put sporting events, school holidays, extracurricular activities, and appointments on the calendar. This will help to eliminate confusion or miscommunications.

Information

Be sure that the school has contact information for both parents. This will help to ensure that both parents get communication from the school, including report cards, handouts, and behavioral updates. This will allow for better communication between parents, children, and the school while navigating co-parenting and back-to-school.

Be Involved

Each parent should try and be as involved as possible in their children’s lives. This is something to really focus on while getting into the co-parenting and back-to-school routines. However, this can be difficult to make time for while juggling work and other living things. Carve out some time to spend time asking them about their day and sit down to help them with their schoolwork. This will show them that you care about them and their success.

In the same way, be sure to attend events at school. A great way to be supportive would be to even show up to events that your ex is at. Examples include school performances, graduations, and functions. You do not have to engage with the other parent if you do not feel comfortable doing so. Just remember that you are there to support your child.

Home Selling Post-Divorce: Moving On & Out

Should you end up with the family home after your divorce, you’ve got a few options at your disposal. One of these could be deciding to sell the home. Still, home selling post-divorce isn’t always easy. However, a few simple things can help your home stand out on the market…

Home Selling Post-Divorce: Helpful Steps

Determine market value

One of the main issues with home selling post-divorce is pricing. Not a lot of people understand what the actual market value of their home is. As such, they figure that their home will be around the same sort of value when they bought it. In reality, it could be that their home is either worth less, or sometimes even more than they believe.

In order to get as best of a price as possible, it’s helpful to use a property appraiser. These professionals will determine your home’s value based on a number of factors. These can include the age, square footage, features, location, and price of other homes in the area. Once you have a good price, it becomes a lot easier to sell your home.

Prep it properly

First impressions are crucial for home selling post-divorce. If you can’t make a good first impression, you’ll find that your home is going to struggle on the market. As such, it’s crucial that you do some initial prep work to help make your home stand out.

This mainly comes down to doing some repairs and cleaning. Touching up some rough spots can be a good investment, as it’ll make your home more appealing compared to others. Same with making sure it’s clean and presentable. Taking that extra time will go a long way in swaying on-the-fence buyers into being seriously interested.

Pick a good agent

Trying to do home selling post-divorce by yourself is a daunting task. There’s a whole lot of details which can be hard to keep track of. This is why it’s good to make use of a real estate agent. At the same time, you need to make sure that you pick the right kind of agent for you.

For starters, you should ensure that they have good reviews and feedback. Also, make sure that they can work with your schedule. As you may have a lot to still take care of, having a flexible agent is a serious plus. This will help you sell your home the right way and in a way which works for you.

Stepparent Discipline: What’s Acceptable?

One of the trickiest things to navigate if you remarry and create a blended family is stepparent discipline. Co-parenting comes in many forms and this is absolutely one of them that takes a bit of adjustment. After all, you want to both be a good parent, but also don’t want them to resent you. Striking that balance can be hard, but you can make it easier by using the right techniques…

Stepparent Discipline: Do It Right

Let your spouse take the lead

When it comes to stepparent discipline, the stepparent shouldn’t be taking the lead initially. During those early months, your stepchild may not fully respect your authority. Therefore, when you do try and discipline them, they’ll either ignore you or get even worse. That’s why you want your partner to take control.

It’s good to let your spouse handle discipline at first. They’ll be more experienced, and your stepchild will hold more respect for what they say. You can try to talk to them in a positive manner when they’re misbehaving and see if they stop. But if they don’t, then let your partner take over.

Don’t be too harsh

When it comes time to implement some stepparent discipline, it’s important to not go to far. Being too harsh on your stepchild will cause them to view you as mean and hurt your relationship. Adjusting to being a stepparent can be hard and you may be a bit stressed. Still, you don’t want that to come out in your punishments.

Your punishments should ideally fit with what your stepchild has done wrong. For example, if they were being mean to someone else, you shouldn’t ground them for a week. Instead, explain why what they did was wrong and send them to their room to calm down. When they don’t feel like they’re being punished unfairly, kids tend to better understand why what they did was wrong.

Hear them out

An important part of stepparent discipline is giving your stepchild a chance to tell their side of things. Much like you have, they too have been going through a lot of change. Not only did they have to deal with their parents divorcing, but now they must adjust to a “new” family. This can bring up a lot of emotions and make them act out in response.

However, by giving them a chance to talk, you can better understand how they feel. That way, you can see why they may be acting a certain way. Instead of punishing them, encourage them to talk to you and use it as a chance to help them and improve your bond.