Customer Inquiry

When it comes to worker’s comp, there are all kinds of reasons, and instances, that might have lead to your receiving benefits. From a fall, a hot pan, a broken platform, and even a work party? When you go to work events, and receive an injury, you might come to realize quickly that you’ve fallen into a gray area (no pun intended). After all, you were there because of work, maybe even in the office building— and you got hurt. So what’s the word on work parties and injury? Do I still receive benefits? 

Work Events and Injury: Do I Still Receive Benefits? 

Well, it depends on a few different things. Most importantly, the reason why you’re there. The first question you need to ask yourself is: do you have to go? Does your boss extend this invitation as an optional event, or does all staff have to make an appearance? This question will become the cornerstone on whether or not you can pursue a claim. 

Furthermore, were you drinking at the time of the accident? 

If you were able to answer ‘yes’ to the question of required attendance, the next question is about your alcohol intake. Just like with any worker’s comp claim, alcohol can undoubtedly get in the way of your receiving benefits. However, it’s still not impossible to receive those benefits, especially if alcohol was a part of the celebration that was supplied to you. 

We see it all the time…

Someone is at a work event, having a good ol’ time mingling with coworkers, friends, and family. However, maybe you take a tumble down the stairs, cut your hand on a broken glass, or fall by the bathroom. When you receive these injuries, you’re likely hoping to have it covered in some capacity. After all, you wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for the work event, and your requested (or required) attendance. 

As we’ve said, this is absolutely a gray area of some sort. For this reason, if you face injury at one of your work events, reach out to an attorney! By speaking with a professional, you can decide what is the smartest path to take— or if you even have a case. A consultation is free, and it can tell you a lot about your potential case.